HIGH IN FAT

boom. technologically lazy. apparently plucky. bookish. picky food enthusiast.

also, i'm not much of a reblogger, so see my likes for some cool shit. actually i lied, i reblog things all the time, but still check out my likes for more cool shit.

iridessence:

fuCK  i screamed

iridessence:

fuCK
i screamed

(Source: tooontofunction)

purepopfornowpeople:

Time is a flat circle.

also,

purepopfornowpeople:

Time is a flat circle.

also,

https://38.media.tumblr.com/9020620c5df3e2cd08823ee91ee663f8/tumblr_n3yhl2yJM81tyvxlmo1_500.gif

(via red3blog)

these two stills made me cry. so i’m gunna go watch the movie.

nevver:

Have a seat

clearly the only person who could sit in this is Voldemort.

crolleen said: I used to think that self-diagnosing was just some Tumblr troll thing. Only recently did I learn that people seriously do it. Why on Earth would anyone think that that is a valid thing to do? Like, even after I was diagnosed, I struggled to believe I was sick, but several professionals (therapists and ultimately and most importantly, doctors) were convinced I was. Anyway, there was no way that I would have been able to diagnose myself. No way at all.

queenmerbabe:

blackmagicalgirlmisandry:

dion-thesocialist:

I am honestly a little suspicious of people who seem very eager to have a mental disorder.

you’re being extremely ableist tbh, I’m not even going to bother making commentary to this post because I already have to deal with so much this bullshit irl

People usually aren’t just ‘eager to have a mental disorder’ like….??? Who’s just eager to have one?

Have some perspective. I’m sorry I can’t have the money or resources to seek therapist/psychiatrists /etc to professionally diagnose me.

I’m eager to speculate possible mental disorders because I’m eager to make some sense out of the difficulties I have with mentally managing and dealing with things in my life. Bc if I could make sense or put words to them I feel like I am a step closer to having a grasp on my problems.

Like…be suspicious all you want but I’mma be suspicious right back like….?

stop confusing ‘being eager to have a mental disorder’ with ‘being eager to understand the problems i already have and find treatment.’

Tips To Induce Vomiting

  1. Say the word ‘cummies.’

softboycollective:

I love my skin!

Sesame Street has always been so good

(Source: arthaemisia, via albinwonderland)

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential
When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.
But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.
Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.
The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.
Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.
From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”
“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.
While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.
When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.
“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.
A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.
“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”
Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.
“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.
As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.
The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.
Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.
Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses
Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.
Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

(via fatgirlopinions)

cracked:

Before you chime in against the “white knights”, ask yourself this simple question: “Would what I’m about to say get me yelled at or punched in my stupid fucking face if I said it in real life?”
4 Ways Gamers Still Suck at Dealing With Women

#4. We’re Incapable of Mature Conversations About Gender
There’s a baffling disconnect where gamers want to be taken seriously, but they also want to be able to call Quinn (or Anita Sarkeesian, or Brianna Wu, or Jennifer Hepler, or the woman who just chainsawed them in half in Gears of War) insults that the average convicted sex offender would consider over the line. They want to have their asshole cake and eat it too.
Well, guess what? If you can’t talk like an adult, then you have to keep sitting at the kids table. But I’ll let you in on another secret: it’s not hard to talk like a sane adult human.

Read More

cracked, save me! i’ve been sucked into the comments!

cracked:

Before you chime in against the “white knights”, ask yourself this simple question: “Would what I’m about to say get me yelled at or punched in my stupid fucking face if I said it in real life?”

4 Ways Gamers Still Suck at Dealing With Women

#4. We’re Incapable of Mature Conversations About Gender

There’s a baffling disconnect where gamers want to be taken seriously, but they also want to be able to call Quinn (or Anita Sarkeesian, or Brianna Wu, or Jennifer Hepler, or the woman who just chainsawed them in half in Gears of War) insults that the average convicted sex offender would consider over the line. They want to have their asshole cake and eat it too.

Well, guess what? If you can’t talk like an adult, then you have to keep sitting at the kids table. But I’ll let you in on another secret: it’s not hard to talk like a sane adult human.

Read More

cracked, save me! i’ve been sucked into the comments!

emmabailey:

zombiemeow13:

queenmerbabe:

thepsychoticfuckingbiotic:

sadim0uto:

sadim0uto:

Hello!! I’m in need of a HUGE signal boost right now (and maybe a big reporting session) because my best friend is being blackmailed by her ex boyfriend. 

I’m not exactly sure what I’m supposed to put here, but I feel like this should be a warning for anyone who knows him and just a general informative thing. Jacob lives in Australia and is 16 years of age. They’ve had a very unhealthy relationship and he’s threatened sending out her nudes multiple times. Jacob is very manipulative and emotionally abusive towards her and even ends up pulling me and her other friends into not being able to do anything because it’ll end up hurting her. He’s made around 7 Twitter accounts to contact my friend in the times that she was trying to get out of the relationship.

In the picture above, he’s posted her nudes and threatened her.

ALL IM ASKING IS FOR YOU TO REPORT HIM ON EVERYTHING AND ANYTHING:

His Twitter accounts all start with @/neinthousand but the one that was most recently used was: @/neinthousand12 (but it was apparently deleted)

His Facebook account is:Jacob R Hynes, and he has more but I am unable to find them. They’re under Jacob Hynes and the like.

********** UPDATES!!! **********

First, we thought we had a compromise. 

Then this happened not even a minute after:

PLEASE CONTINUE REBLOGGING THIS. My friend is only 15 years of age and this is absolutely horrible. We’re getting ahold of local authorities but if you see the pictures anywhere (namely twitter) REPORT THEM IMMEDIATELY.

Put this guy on blast. Detestable scum.

Fucking ruin him.

Shit. This brings back so much emotional crap. I was in a relationship with someone just like this and I feel for the girl (I’m assuming it’s a girl, if I am wrong please correct me)

People like him are not people, they are animals.

Fuckin gross ass nerd.

can i get some verification on this? because when you go to OP’s blog it just says ‘I LIED TROLOLOLLOLOL’

“Why have 20 states refused to take part in Medicaid expansion? It’s not because of how the Affordable Care Act was written. All states currently participate in Medicaid—it is a good deal for a state to do so. The ACA changed Medicaid. But John Roberts rewrote the law from his post on the Supreme Court to give states the option of (a) simply continuing with Medicaid-as-it-exists-in-2013 in addition to the options of (b) participating in Medicaid-as-it-exists-in-2014 and (c) dropping Medicaid entirely. When John Roberts rewrote the ACA from the bench, he did so very badly. The expansion of Medicaid meant that a great many people who used to show up at safety-net hospitals without any insurance at all will now be covered by Medicaid, so the rationale for the Disproportionate Share Payments to safety-net hospitals that treat the uninsured will go away, hence the ACA eliminates the no longer-needed DSP. But in states in which Medicaid isn’t expanded, the need for the DSP remains. When Roberts rewrote the law, did he rewrite the law so that the DSP remains for states that do not accept Medicaid expansion? No. Will safety-net hospitals in non-expanding states close as a result? Some of them, probably, without some other emergency fix.”

When reality overtakes satire: Scottish edition

assholeofday:

image

by TeaPartyCat ()

Last night I joked on Twitter that I didn’t care about whether Scotland voted for independence since no one had explained how to blame it on Obama:

And then only minutes later I got this reply:

So I checked it out, and sure enough, if Scotland votes for independence, Frum wants to blame Obama:

In February 1995, Bill Clinton traveled to Ottawa to speak in favor of Canadian unity. “In a world darkened by ethnic conflicts that tear nations apart, Canada stands as a model of how people of different cultures can live and work together in peace, prosperity, and mutual respect,” Clinton told the Canadian Parliament. The U.S. president was a more popular figure in Quebec than that province’s own politicians, and his words likely contributed to the narrow margin of victory of the ‘No’ side in Quebec’s second and final secession referendum later that year. President Obama has played no equivalent role in the debate over the survival of America’s close ally, the United Kingdom. If the ‘Yes’ vote prevails on September 18, Obama’s omission should be remembered in the postmortem assignment of blame for a potential disaster for the peoples of Britain, Europe, and the Western alliance.

You see, Obama is now responsible for the outcomes of votes in other countries because he didn’t use his magic speech-making abilities to hypnotize them into serving the interests of the United States.

Look, if you believe in democracy, shouldn’t people in other countries be allowed to vote for their own interests and not be browbeat into voting for America’s interests?

It’s all yet more proof how hard it is to write satire when these assholes find a way to do things that were previously thought to be jokes.

(via ithinkofdemons)

cracked:

People shared iterations of that story well over a million times, because it serves that child right for being so…child-like.

4 Types of Bullying We Are Shockingly OK With

had these same thoughts when that story came out.